Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
About Deviant RedLittleHouseStudiosOther/Spain Recent Activity
Deviant for 2 Years
Needs Core Membership
Statistics 89 Deviations 1,148 Comments 23,929 Pageviews
×

Newest Deviations

Favourites

Groups

Activity


☞ ENGLISH:

At this point, we need the places that Cherry will visit in the adventure to take shape using the ideas that the script presents. The place where everything happens is the Hyperion Hotel, an old building divided in floors. These floors are, in turn, subdivided in scenes, the basic element that we use to create the environments the adventure will take place in. Each scene follows the same guidelines and process to eventually become the stage Cherry will walk on.
Before starting to work on Crazy Hotel’s concept art the whole team meets to discuss and present their views on how they envision each of the hotel’s environments. This way it’s easier to achieve a global vision of the different stages from every perspective.
At first, concept art work is done with complete freedom, not even knowing or caring about which elements will fit in the future level. Still, it’s important to not lose sight of the style used in the other scenes and to never forget about the particular traits of cartoons: curvy objects with face, round and fluffy arms and legs… Always a bit over the top. These cartoony objects are usually mixed with commonplace designs though, this is so that there’s not an overload of visual information in a given stage.



Using these concepts as a basis it’s now time to start building the playable tile map. This map will serve as the foundations over which all the objects and characters will be placed and should try to combine the best of the drawings created previously, taking always into account the importance of gameplay and the function of the stage in the story. When assigning the collision tiles of the level one should put some thought into how the player will move through the game world, which are the pathways that will be more commonly traversed (because they connect the level to other scenes, because they lead to a character or item that’s important to progress in the game) and design the stage accordingly so that it’s easy to move around, minimizing the number of obstacles the player will encounter.
Each tile must be assigned a type that defines it’s behaviour and interaction with Cherry and the stage elements. Thus, a tile can be a collision, a pit, a connection between scenes or a body of water, among others.



Once again the team joins to review all the work done until this point. Here it’s decided what stays and what goes, this is one of the first filters the artistic process must go through. Sometimes an idea that seemed good on paper does not work so well after translating it into a tile map, so it must be reconsidered or discarded.
With the general look of a level mostly settled, pencil and rubber are replaced with a graphics tablet and work continues to the next step: ingame sketches. This is temporary art, outlined in blue (or red if an object is interactive) and filled with white color so that objects and characters don’t overlay and blend visually. These drawings are placed in a specific isometric grid where the whole stage gets drawn exactly as it would look in the Unity engine.
It’s now when we start taking into account the size of the objects and characters as their collisions will always fill the size of a tile. If we don’t take care allocating the elements, the players would feel that they’re colliding with empty spaces near thin objects which don’t have a collision related to their design. The most troublesome elements are those whose size or width is pretty small, such as a coat rack, a floor lamp or a little ball. There is no easy solution to this, although grouping these objects together or putting them inside bigger objects should do.



While adding provisional graphics to the scene, we also start working in its logic. That way, we start assigning the corresponding dialog to the room characters and objects.
If there are puzzle elements on the scene, they’re added in this moment. These elements can be generic and reusable (such as boxes or buttons) or they may require some specific graphics. Cherry’s spawn points are also placed now, and we assign the scenes that connect with this room.
Finally, we code all the specific behaviours needed in the current room. This is a must to take into account the player progress or to modify the scene accordingly to show that progress.
At this point, the scene is fully playable and interactive. We can now test it and see if the design works as we intended. It’s very likely that each time the game is tested, we find some issues we need to change, going back to previous stages. The testing should be thorough enough to find most mistakes before we start producing the final graphics, but that’s not always possible and many scenes have to change months after we thought they were finished.
When everything has been checked enough times, next stage goes to the art division: the final graphics. Here we have the two different styles we’ve talked about before; first the background, non-interactive objects; and secondly, those which, among the characters, change their state or are interactive. The first sort has a treatment closest to painting, it has light and shadows and demands  a higher level of detail, as an example, it’s different to paint wood textures than stone. On the other hand, we have the interactive objects, which have a precise line thickness that is the same for all objects and they are painted with plain colors from a defined color palette.
As you can see, creating a scene is a very cyclical process, going over the art, code and the room design again and again, until we get the final result. But it’s thanks to this process that we get scenes where logic and art blend together into a single goal.




ESPAÑOL:

Llegados a este punto, necesitamos que los lugares que Cherry visita en la historia tomen forma más allá de las ideas que presenta el guión. El lugar donde ocurre todo es el Hotel Hyperion, que, como es un edificio, está dividido en plantas. A su vez, estas plantas se subdividen en escenas, el elemento del que partimos a la hora de crear los escenarios de la aventura. Y cada escena sigue un proceso casi idéntico para llegar desde la idea hasta el suelo que pisa Cherry.
A la hora de crear el arte conceptual de “Crazy Hotel”, el equipo se reúne previamente para exponer sus opiniones y visiones sobre cómo imaginan cada una de las zonas del hotel siendo así más sencillo que haya una visión global de ciertas escenas y ambientes desde todas las perspectivas. El equipo entero es parte viviente de lo que se va a expresar en el juego.
Cuando se comienza a dibujar, se hace con total libertad, ni siquiera sabiendo qué cosas encajarán al pasarlo al escenario “real”. Además, es importante no perder de vista el estilo utilizado en el resto de salas y no olvidar nunca las características particulares de la línea cartoon (propias y adquiridas): objetos retorcidos, con cara, brazos, pies…, blanditos e hinchados. Siempre exagerados. Cierto es que a veces están mezclados con otros objetos más corrientes que no tienen “personalidad”; esto ocurre para que no haya un colapso de información visual en cada escenario.

A partir de los distintos conceptos de escenario para una determinada escena se comienza en este momento a crear el mapa de tiles jugable por el que se moverá Cherry. Este mapa deberá servir de base para colocar en el futuro los objetos dibujados y deberá conciliar lo mejor de los conceptos creados anteriormente, teniendo siempre en cuenta la jugabilidad y la función del escenario. A la hora de asignar los tiles de colisión del escenario hay que valorar la navegabilidad del mismo, pensar de qué manera lo va a recorrer el jugador, cuales son los caminos que más se van a transitar (porque conectan con otras escenas, porque llevan a un objeto o personaje importante para el progreso en el juego) y diseñarlos en consecuencia, de manera que sean sencillos de recorrer, minimizando el número de obstáculos y dificultades para el jugador.
Cada tile del escenario deberá estar asignado con el tipo de tile que corresponda. El tipo define el comportamiento del tile, su interacción con Cherry y con los objetos del escenario. Así, un tile podrá ser una pared colisionable, un agujero, una conexión entre escenas o una superficie de agua, entre otros.

Y de nuevo, se repite el proceso de supervisión del equipo con el concept art ya realizado. Aquí se decide qué se queda dentro del juego y qué no: es uno de los primeros filtros por los que transcurre el proceso artístico, pero ni mucho menos el último. A veces, una idea es buena sobre el papel y en el momento de traspasarla al mapa de tiles, tenemos que desecharla ya que no encaja o no se entiende o simplemente es un guiño que alarga innecesariamente recorrido o guión.
Decidido el aspecto general de las salas, y moviéndose el arte en paralelo con la programación, el papel y el lápiz se sustituyen por una tableta gráfica y da comienzo el siguiente paso: los bocetos in game. Se trata de un tipo de arte provisional, normalmente tratado solo a línea azul (o roja si son objetos interactuables) y relleno de blanco para que cuando los objetos y los personajes se superpongan, no se mezclen visualmente. El material se va extrayendo de los concepts -scans y/o fotografías- y colocando en una grid especial en vista isométrica donde se dibuja la sala entera tal y como quedaría si estuviese en la grid de Unity.
En este punto, se comienza a tener en cuenta el tamaño de los objetos y personajes diseñados puesto que las colisiones ocuparán siempre como mínimo el tamaño predeterminado de un tile cuadrado. De no tener cuidado al distribuir los objetos, el jugador podrá pensar en ocasiones que está colisionando con espacios vacíos u objetos estrechos que no tienen una colisión correspondiente con su representación. Normalmente los objetos más problemáticos son aquellos pequeños, finos y/o alargados, como puede ser un perchero, una lámpara de pie o una pelota. La solución a ésto nunca es fácil, sin embargo, agrupar dichos objetos o incrustarlos dentro de otros más grandes suele funcionar.

Mientras se va añadiendo el arte provisional del escenario, se comienza también a trabajar en la lógica del mismo. Así, se comienzan a asignar las conversaciones correspondientes a los personajes y objetos de la escena. Si hay objetos de puzzle en la escena se añaden en este momento. Estos objetos puede ser genéricos y reutilizables (como las cajas o botones) o pueden requerir de arte específico.
También se definen los puntos de aparición de Cherry y se asignarán las escenas con las que está conectado el escenario actual.
Por último se creará toda la lógica específica que sea necesaria para la sala actual. Esto será imprescindible para actualizar el progreso del jugador o modificar el escenario de acuerdo a ese progreso.
Llegado este momento el escenario es completamente jugable e interactuable. Ya se puede testear y probar si el diseño funciona como se esperaba. Es fácil que al probarlo se detecten nuevos problemas y que haya que volver a alguna de las etapas anteriores para realizar cambios. El testeo debería ser suficientemente exhaustivo para detectar la mayoría de fallos antes de comenzar a producir el arte definitivo, pero esto no siempre es posible, muchos escenarios siguen cambiando meses después de pensar que estaban completados.
Cuando todo está lo bastante supervisado, se pasa al siguiente nivel en el departamento gráfico: el arte final. Aquí tenemos dos tipos de variantes que ya han sido nombradas con anterioridad, una, los objetos que se encuentran al fondo y que no son interactuables y dos, aquellos que, junto con los personajes, cambian de estado o son interactuables. La primera de ellas tiene un tratamiento más relacionado con la pintura, existen claroscuros y degradados y se exige un nivel de detalle un poco mayor. Los materiales de los que están formados los objetos influyen en cómo han de ser pintados, por ejemplo es distinto el proceso de pintar madera que piedra. Y por otro lado los interactuables, que tienen un grosor de línea muy preciso e igual para todos y están pintados con colores planos en una gama de grises definida.
Como podéis ver, el proceso de crear un escenario es muy cíclico, volviendo a revisar el arte, el código y el diseño de la propia sala hasta obtener el resultado final. Pero gracias a este proceso es como obtenemos escenarios donde la lógica y el arte se funden de forma ideal en un único objetivo.


☞ ENGLISH:

The Beginnings
To explain the how and why the “Fleish & Cherry in Crazy Hotel” script is written the way it is we have to go back in time when an idea made this adventure start, the idea of turning over the “hero rescues damsel from the villain” premise. We were pushed by this idea to commit the best of our mistakes: trying to crowd-fund the game. And so, we made the transition form “making a game” to “creating a project” and we forgot about the “game” concept. We started to expand the universe, the characters and the story. In short, we created a monster. And what happened then? We failed the crowdfunding, hitting us again with reality and making us rethink again the game.

Second attempt
We kept all what we liked about it, that was not just the aesthetics, but also the twist. We asked ourselves: “what do we want to tell with this game?”. And more important, “how are we goint to tell it playing”?

The questions were right, but the answers we gave in that moment were wrong. We failed again since we took that monster and make it playable. We filled the hotel floors with poorly playable situations with characters we’ve already created. There were no explanation, depth or meaning in all of that. Cherry was just a character that moved on untill she reached Fleish.

The monster devoured us.




Third time lucky
We stopped again and this time, we finally were down to earth. At last we were aware that the game was a monster and it’d got out of hand, and as we have to face it.

That’s how, since 2014, we started developing “Fleish & Cherry in Crazy Hotel” the way it’s meant to be developed. We don’t reckon the work we made beforeas part of the game development, but as a time we used to learn the hard way how to properly make games, and we learned a lot. And what we talk about in the present article, we improve the way of designing our game’s narrative.

The first thing we do to accomplish that was remove everything. No matter how painful it were, we made a very necessary hard reset. We only kept the essence that made us fall in love with the idea, and that wasn’t “an adventure to rescue a character”. As writers, we wanted to rescue Cherry. She is the game foundation and all our attention had to revolve around her. What we wanted to tell was her change from damsel in distress to heroine. And we wanted not only to tell that evolution, but make it playable.



Cherry
If we wanted to tell Cherry’s evolution, what we had to do was defragment that evolution through the game. We could say that every step in the story was a stage in Cherry’s evolution.

We set several phases and situations through all the adventure that depict the basic structure of Cherry’s path to be a heroine. But there was a previous step we have already done before: Cherry’s character development. We had already well defined her personality, she had a past and we know how her future was going to be. We know how Cherry was, we’ve already met her. And well-knowing your characters is something we needed to do if we want the players to know them too. That’s why we had to study very well how to make that introdutcion, an introduction we’ll be doing over all the game.

The Universe
Now that we had a well defined Cherry, we needed to put her into some Universe. An universe that were being defined with its own cartoon rules, where the characters know they are drawn, where their lives are told through cartoon short movies and they speak with meta-language and where above all, Fleish is the star and Mr. Mallow his nemesis. All of that is made for and around Cherry.

And how do we see this Universe in game? Through the scenes, the characters, the dialogs, the puzzles, etc.

Scenes
Each setting is thought and designed with a specific goal in mind. The challenge we faced creating them was transforming your usual hotel into a “cartoon” hotel. The scenes had to be common hotel areas but with a cartoon touch, and should help the player understand how this world works while accomodating the necessary space for puzzles and situations that took place.

We had an example of this in the garden, which is also a hairdresser for plants.

This gave us freedom to build any sort of places inside the hotel. No one will miss walk around Toonville given that it’ll be felt inside the hotel four walls. We’ll be able to find deserts, jungles, ships, etc., inside Hotel Hyperion.

Puzzles
We wanted to show the cartoon humor and madness while designing the puzzles and their resolution. One of the main characteristics of the cartoons, that make people laugh is the lack of rational behaviour. That was something hard to apply, as the puzzles need a logic solution. So we have to be careful and think thorough how to solve them so the cartoon logic won’t conceal the graphic adventure experience we are aiming for while being funny.

In addition, while solving puzzles we wanted not only make the story progress, but show more of Cherry’s personality.

Characters

This time, the characters in the game were created with what we wanted to tell about Cherry and not the other way around.

We also have characters like Fleish or Mr. Mallow, that while they are on the rooftop (Cherry’s last stop in her adventure), their presence is noted in every floor and will accompany her. How do we achieve it? With elements on the scene, with Cherry comments, with dialog with other characters, that show us the idea of Hero and the Antagonist from Toonville universe.

The Journey
After this we start to trace the “ideal journey” we wanted Cherry to make, placing the key events in the order we considered right for the story to flow.

Even with that path in mind, we always designed it giving some freedom to the players for them to find it. That freedom has consequences, as the player might miss some information, which won’t be necessary to finish the game, it would make the world Cherry lives in deeper.

Dialogs
Making a graphic adventure, the story is very important and the charisma that the characters show will hook the players or set them away.

That’s why we analyse in deep the character that’s going to talk, we describe their personality, what we want them to pass down and the themes they are going to convey. We try not to make the dialogs too long, given the game hybrid nature, keeping a balance between graphic adventure and environmental puzzles.

Themes
All the elementes we’ve loaded with narrative are encapsulated within the themes we want to convey in “Fleish & Cherry in Crazy Hotel”, with Cherry’s evolution as its flagship. As we said before, when we restarted the game back in 2014, we established a series of themes that had to be in the game, for example, each of Cherry’s fears, the way she sees herself as a toon, her friendship with some of the characters, Fleish’s presence in Toonville or the fact that the short movies are events in the Toonville inhabitants’ lives.

We started from a minimalist entry point, some words or short sentences that represented those themes and we made them grow and spread throughout the game as pieces of a giant puzzle. Following this metaphor, the pieces are delivered to the player through the hotel so the player will have a complete image once he finish the game. We want the players to keep that feeling and be subtle about it, as we have dedicated a lot of time to it.





Working Method
We forced ourselves to be away from computers and any other technologic gadgets while creating, designing and even writing the script. Our tools have been notebooks, pieces of paper, pens… while generating our own design maps of the different game levels. Our intention was to have everything within reach and to be able to see everything at a glance. These maps where the perfect board to place all the characters, objects, positions, routes and themes, that we represented with different colors.

After all that process, we used Unity add-on Dialoguer to place the script in-game.

Conclusion
Something we want to emphasize after designing the narrative and writing the script is that you have to respect, know and learn from the medium you are working on. It’s not a novel, not a comic, neither a movie. It’s a videogame. There are other rules, another method of narration, and its bigger qualities, such as interactivity, have to be protected to make sure the story is telled the way we want to.


ESPAÑOL:

Inicios
Para poder explicar el cómo y el por qué está escrito actualmente así el guión de “Fleish & Cherry in Crazy Hotel” tenemos que remontarnos a la época donde una idea hizo que esta aventura comenzara, la idea de invertir la premisa “El héroe rescata a la damisela en apuros de las manos del villano”. Esta idea nos empujó a realizar el mejor de nuestros errores: intentar financiarnos por medio de un crowdfunding. Pasamos de “hacer un juego” a crear “un proyecto” y nos olvidamos por completo del concepto de “juego”. Comenzamos a expandir el universo, los personajes y la historia. Creamos, en definitiva, un monstruo. ¿Y qué ocurrió? Fallamos el crowdfunding, un golpe que nos bajó de nuevo a la realidad y que nos hizo replantearnos, de nuevo, el juego.

Segundo intento
Cogimos lo que nos gustaba de él, que no era solo la estética, sino sobre todo ese giro de tuerca. Nos hicimos la pregunta: “¿Qué queremos contar en este juego?”. Y lo más importante, ¿cómo vamos a contarlo jugándolo?

Las preguntas estaban bien hechas, pero las respuestas que dimos para contestarlas en ese momento fueron incorrectas. Volvimos de nuevo a equivocarnos ya que lo que hicimos fue coger ese monstruo y lo adaptamos a un juego, hicimos el monstruo jugable. Rellenamos las plantas del hotel con situaciones y pobres excusas jugables con los personajes que ya teníamos creados. No había justificación, profundidad, ni intenciones en todo ello. Cherry simplemente era un personaje que iba avanzando hasta llegar a Fleish.
El propio monstruo nos devoró.

A la tercera va la vencida
Volvimos a detenernos, y esta vez sí, pusimos los pies en la Tierra. Por fin éramos conscientes de que lo que teníamos era un monstruo que se nos había ido de las manos, y lo que teníamos que hacer, como se hace con los monstruos, era enfrentarnos a él.

Y de esa forma fue como, a partir del año 2014, empezamos a desarrollar correctamente “Fleish & Cherry in Crazy Hotel”. Hasta este momento consideramos que el trabajo hecho en esa época no forma parte del desarrollo del juego, sino más bien, fue como una propia escuela a base de golpes de los que aprender mucho. Y en el caso que abordamos en este artículo, maduramos la forma de diseñar la narrativa de nuestro juego.
Para ello, lo primero que hicimos fue eliminar todo. Hicimos un reinicio que, aunque doliera, era necesario. Únicamente rescatamos la esencia de lo que nos hizo enamorarnos de esta idea, y no era “una aventura para rescatar a un personaje”. Como guionistas, queríamos rescatar a Cherry. Ella es la base del juego y toda nuestra atención tenía que centrarse en ella. Lo que queríamos contar era su paso de “damisela en apuros a heroína”. Y esa evolución es lo que queríamos que se contara y, por lo tanto, que se jugara.

Cherry

Así pues, si lo que queríamos era jugar la evolución de Cherry, lo que teníamos que hacer era desfragmentar esa evolución en el juego. Se podría decir que cada avance en la historia era una fase de evolución de Cherry.
Hemos establecido varias etapas y situaciones a lo largo de la aventura que representan el esqueleto evolutivo de la conversión de Cherry en heroína. Pero para desfragmentar esa evolución había que hacer un paso previo, algo que nosotros ya teníamos hecho anteriormente (no todo lo hicimos mal en esos tiempos), y era el desarrollo del personaje de Cherry. Habíamos definido muy bien su personalidad, le habíamos creado un pasado y sabíamos cómo iba a ser su futuro. Sabíamos cómo era Cherry, ya la conocíamos. Y conocer bien a tus personajes es algo muy importante para que los jugadores también lo hagan y para eso hay que estudiar muy bien como hacer esa presentación, una presentación que se hará a lo largo de todo el juego.

El Universo
Ya tenemos bien definida a Cherry, y ahora había que meterla dentro de un Universo. Un Universo que se fue creando con sus propias reglas cartoons, donde los personajes son conscientes de que son dibujos animados, donde su vida se cuenta a través de los cortos en los que han participado y se expresan con metalenguaje y, sobre todo, donde Fleish es la estrella y Mr. Mallow su enemigo. Todo ello está ahí creado por y para Cherry.

¿Y cómo vemos reflejado ese Universo en el juego? A través de los escenarios, los personajes, los diálogos, los puzzles, etc.

Escenarios
Cada escenario está pensado y diseñado para realizar una función determinada. El reto al que nos enfrentábamos a la hora de concebir los escenarios era convertir un hotel “normal” en un hotel “de dibujos animados”. Los escenarios tenían que ser zonas propias de un hotel, pero con ese toque cartoon, y debían ayudar al jugador a entender cómo funciona ese mundo de dibujos animados, además de para alojar situaciones y puzzles que en ellos se desarrollarán.

Un ejemplo de ello lo tenemos con el jardín, convertido en una peluquería para las plantas.
Eso nos otorgaba una libertad increíble para crear todo tipo de sitios dentro de un hotel. Nadie echará de menos pasearse por Toonville ya que éste es como si estuviera dentro de las 4 paredes del hotel. Perfectamente podemos encontrarnos desiertos, junglas, barcos, etc. dentro del Hotel Hyperion.

Los Puzzles
El factor “humor y locura de los dibujos animados” queríamos que estuviera muy presente a la hora de diseñar los distintos puzzles y la resolución de éstos. Una de las principales características de los dibujos animados y que más nos hace reír de ellos es su falta de razonamiento al actuar. Aplicar eso en un juego es complicado, pues para la resolución de los puzzles los jugadores necesitan una lógica a la que aferrarse para resolverlos. Así que teníamos que tener mucho cuidado y pensar muy bien cómo desarrollarlos para que la lógica de un dibujo animado divierta en vez de entorpecer la experiencia de aventura gráfica clásica que buscábamos.

Además, con la resolución de los puzzles también buscábamos, aparte de avanzar en la historia y saber más sobre el funcionamiento de este Universo, conocer más a Cherry.

Los Personajes
Los personajes del juego, esta vez sí, se crean a raíz de las necesidades de Cherry, de lo que queremos transmitir o que se transmita en relación a ella, y no al revés.

Luego tenemos el caso de personajes como Fleish o Mr. Mallow, que aunque están en la azotea del hotel, es decir, la última parada de Cherry en su aventura, su presencia aparece en todas las plantas y la acompañará. ¿Cómo lo conseguimos? Con elementos del escenario, comentarios de Cherry y con los diálogos entre los personajes, que nos presentan la figura del Protagonista y el Antagonista del universo de Toonville.

El Recorrido
Es ahora cuando empezamos a trazar el “recorrido ideal” que querríamos que Cherry hiciera, situando los acontecimientos “clave” en el orden que consideramos correcto para el ritmo de desarrollo de la historia.

Aunque creamos un camino, siempre diseñamos este recorrido de manera que exista cierta libertad en el jugador para descubrir ese camino. Esa libertad que dejamos al jugador tiene consecuencias, pues puede ser que el jugador pierda información, no necesaria para el avance de la historia, pero sí interesante para conocer a Cherry y su Universo.

Diálogos
En una aventura gráfica, la historia tiene una gran importancia y lo carismáticos que sean los personajes hará que el jugador se enganche o no al juego.

Es por ello que a la hora de trabajar los diálogos analizamos bien el personaje con el que se va a hablar, describimos su personalidad, lo que queremos que nos transmita, y los temas que se van a hablar con él. Buscamos que los diálogos no sean muy largos, debido al género híbrido de nuestro juego, buscando el equilibrio entre la aventura gráfica y los puzzles ambientales.

Temas
Y todos estos elementos que hemos rellenado de alta carga narrativa están englobados en una serie de temas que queremos contar y transmitir en “Fleish y Cherry in Crazy Hotel” capitaneados por la evolución de Cherry. Como hemos dicho anteriormente, cuando comenzamos de nuevo con el desarrollo del juego en 2014, establecimos una serie de temas que estarían en el juego, como por ejemplo cada miedo de Cherry, su forma de verse como un tipo de dibujo animado específico, su amistad con algunos personajes, la presencia de Fleish en Toonville, o el propio lore que tiene el universo del juego con esa cronología de cortos como eventos de la vida de los personajes.

Partimos de una base minimalista. Empezábamos con palabras, frases cortas que representaban esos temas y los fuimos expandiendo y desfragmentando a lo largo del juego como un gran puzzle. Y siguiendo con esa metáfora, hemos repartido todas las piezas por el hotel para que el jugador reciba una imagen completa de lo que queremos transmitirle y regalarle una vez finalice el juego. Queremos que se quede con esa sensación y ser sutiles a la hora de hacerlo, realmente hemos dedicado mucho tiempo a ello.

Método de trabajo
Nos impusimos una forma de trabajo nuestra: apartarnos lo máximo posible de los ordenadores y recursos tecnológicos a la hora de inventar, crear, diseñar e incluso escribir el guión. Nuestras herramientas han sido muchas libretas, hojas en blanco, bolis e incluso cartulinas de A2 en las cuales hemos generado nuestros propios mapas de diseño de los distintos niveles del juego. Nuestra intención era tener todo a mano, que pudiéramos contemplarlo todo en un vistazo. Esas cartulinas eran un tablero perfecto para poner ahí todos los personajes, los objetos, sus posiciones, recorridos e incluso los temas, los cuales pintábamos con distintos colores en las zonas dedicadas a un tema en concreto.

Más tarde pasamos todos los diálogos del juego al ordenador con la ayuda de la herramienta de Unity, “Dialoguer”.

Conclusión
En definitiva una de las cosas que más resaltamos del proceso que hemos vivido con el diseño narrativo y con el guión del juego, es que hay que respetar, conocer y aprender mucho el medio con el que trabajamos. No es una novela, un cómic o una película, es un videojuego. Hay otras reglas, otro método de narración, y hay que proteger sus grandes cualidades, como es la interactividad del jugador en nuestro beneficio para poder transmitirle de la forma que deseamos esa historia que contar.





☞ ENGLISH:

Cherry: from concept to paper

As we said before, the Damsel in Distress trope has a special significance within Crazy Hotel. We reversed it so our story would be different, both from a nowadays perspective and as it'd be seen in the 1930's – 1940's, and that has influenced Cherry's artistic evolution. Our story started with the usual boy-rescues-girl structure, but as we wanted to turn the idea around, we swapped the main characters' roles. This time it was she who had the courage to fight for her love and search for him. So, how should we start designing Cherry? Since in the first iteration of the game Fleish was going to be the main character, his design progressed a lot in the beginning, but then he was put aside to make way for Cherry. Even then, it was clear that Fleish and Cherry weren't going to be a typical couple: she is human, he's a fox. The traits that define both characters are very different, however, if we go back in time to the golden age of animation, we would find Betty Boop and Bimbo, whose traits were also very different, and while they both originated as animals, Betty Boop was redesigned as human and Bimbo was left as her pet.



Starting from this premise, Cherry's artistic design went through three different stages. We can see a very thin and very long Cherry in the initial sketches; her looks should draw inspiration from the classic pin-up girls, but softening the naughtiness and the sexy girl symbolism. Therefore, our first mistake in character design was the conflict between what we were looking to achieve and what we were expressing. The trend of that time implied a fuller figure and Cherry should express sweetness, innocence and joy. Nevertheless, the elements defining that Cherry are still used nowadays: the high heels, the over the knee dress and the bow in her hair.

Since her physical appearance was excessively based in our current age, we decided to reshape Cherry and give her rounder, simpler forms, filling her body and shortening her limbs. And yet, a new flaw had to be fixed: her shape wasn't still round enough, keeping shapes and angles from a more current character design, not to speak of the hardness the black bow conveyed, not very suited to Cherry's personality.
With these changes, we got Cherry very close to how we know her now: the look of her face, the bow, the loops of her hair and the shoes were redrawn rounder and fluffier, and softer color tones were used in the final color palette.
The changes after Cherry's third version happened naturally, speaking both graphically and artistically. She is the same character at her core, but she has grown up and her design is more settled, with a thicker and more cartoonish ink stroke and a better balanced body. The finishing details such as her lips, the loops of her hair, the point of the shoes, the dress length... give Cherry her charisma. In short, Cherry has found her definitive look after a long way. And there is still a long way ahead!


The heroine's animated journey

At this point we had Cherry's look that suited her nature, a structure that defined her both internally and externally... But she still wasn't the animated cartoon she was meant to be. And it wasn't easy because we had very high expectations regarding how Cherry should be animated, and if we had failed to deliver that, what we wanted to pass on to the player would have been endangered.
And that's just what happened in the beginning. We needed an animated Cherry in the early stages of development so we would be able to test the gameplay we were looking for. We can say that that Cherry had a rough time caused by our inexperience during those first stages. We expected that Cherry to be the final one, as we only needed her to have a walking cycle and an idle cycle of 8 frames each. And that order was executed, we had a main character able to walk by player's command and, when the player didn't move her, she was just breathing absent- minded. While we kept that Cherry in the world we were creating, after some beatings we started changing and growing up creatively... and we realized our big mistake, we had an animated main character, but she wasn't Cherry. They were just a walking cycle and an idle cycle any character could use, but our Cherry demanded her own way of being to be embodied in each and everyone of her frames!



As we’ve said before, there was a particular moment in the history of the game’s development in which we realized that we had to revise and improve everything we had done until that point. We had to really put a lot of thought into the key question “What is the story we want to tell?”, and act accordingly. And if we were going to walk this new path, every step forward would make us stronger and help us grow as creators and Cherry would have to join us along the way. She needed a new walk cycle, a new approach as a cartoon character.

The whole team worked for an entire month to ensure that this new Cherry would be the Cherry we wanted to lead our game and its story. There were lots of tests, we walked through the hallways of our studio countless times, many erasers were lost in the process. This new Cherry was born in a lightbox using a traditional animation method, unlike the previous, rougher one, which was made digitally. We could say her soul was drawn with a pencil, trying to find a balance between cheerful charisma and feminine shyness. Cherry is not a sexual icon like Betty Boop, nor does she have Mickey Mouse’s extroverted personality. Her animation draws from many sources, including some that don’t fit in their historical context. We’ve taken into account how people perceive the animation of the 1920’s and 30’s. Very few cartoons actually moved up and down rhythmically, but most of us remember them that way, and that’s how they are shown in many present recreations of the style, as can be seen in “Futurama” and “Looney Tunes”.
Cherry is finally complete and she’s walking her own way in the world we’re creating. After all the missteps she’s had through her development, every new step she takes gives us strength to keep walking our path and make the game a reality. Ironically, our damsel in distress is the one that’s saved us in our own story, she’s our heroine and now it’s up to us to return the favor!




ESPAÑOL:

Cherry: del concepto al papel

Como bien se ha hablado con anterioridad, el tópico “Damisela en apuros” adquiere una importancia muy característica dentro de Crazy Hotel. La vuelta de tuerca dada en dicho tópico para que nuestra historia fuera diferente, tanto visto desde la perspectiva de nuestra época actual como en la de los propios años 1930s-40s queda también plasmada en la evolución artística de Cherry. Al comienzo, la historia se centraba en el típico esquema de chico rescata a chica, y queriendo dar un giro a este clásico se decidió intercambiar los roles. Esta vez ella tenía el poder de luchar por su amor e ir en su busca. Así pues, ¿por dónde empezar a diseñar a Cherry? Puesto que en primera instancia Fleish iba a ser el protagonista de la historia, éste obtuvo un fuerte desarrollo inicial dejándolo después un poco “de lado” para dar paso a Cherry. Lo que estaba claro era que Fleish y Cherry no iba a ser una pareja a la vieja usanza: ella es humana y él, un zorrito. Los rasgos que caracterizan a ambos personajes son de por sí muy distintos, sin embargo, si nos remontamos a la época dorada de la animación también lo eran entonces los diseños de Betty Boop y Bimbo, donde ambos comenzaron siendo animales aunque Betty Boop conservó un aspecto mucho más humanizado que con el tiempo evolucionó a completamente humana y Bimbo quedó como su mascota.

Pues bien, partiendo de esta premisa Cherry pasó por tres etapas distintas en su forma artística. En los bocetos iniciales podemos ver a una Cherry muy delgada y larguirucha; su aspecto debía beber de las clásicas pin-up de la época pero restándole la picardía y la simbología de chica sexy, por lo tanto, el primer fallo a nivel de diseño de personaje radica en el choque entre lo que se buscaba y lo que se estaba expresando. La moda de la época implicaba unas siluetas más “llenas” y Cherry debía expresar dulzura, inocencia y alegría. Aún así, los elementos que la componían se han conservado hasta el día de hoy: tacones, vestido por encima de la rodilla y lazo en la cabeza.

Dado que su forma física estaba demasiado encasillada en nuestra época actual, se decidió remodelar y usar formas más redondeadas, más básicas, engordando su cuerpo y acortando sus extremidades. No obstante, existía un nuevo defecto a ser resuelto y es que su forma no era todavía totalmente redondeada; aún conservaba ángulos y formas “actuales”, por no hablar de la dureza que transmitía el lazo en tono negro, muy poco apropiada al carácter de nuestra protagonista.

Este cambio llevó a Cherry a más o menos ser la Cherry que conocemos: la apariencia de la cara, el lazo, las ondas del cabello, el flequillo y los zapatos se rehicieron mucho más circulares y “blanditos” y se usaron tonos suaves en su paleta de color definitiva.

Los siguientes cambios que preceden a la tercera generación de Cherry son evoluciones naturales, gráfica y artísticamente hablando. En base sigue siendo la misma protagonista, pero ha madurado y asentado su diseño, con un trazo de línea mucho más grueso y cartoonesco y un cuerpo más equilibrado. Los detalles más superficiales la dotan del carisma necesario como los labios, las curvas que se forman en las ondas del pelo, las puntas de los zapatos, la longitud del vestido… En resumen, Cherry ha encontrado su aspecto definitivo después de un largo camino. ¡Y todavía queda por recorrer! Y para hacerlo necesitará algo…. ¡Más frames para estar animada!

El camino animado de la heroína

Llegados a este punto teníamos a una Cherry que se ajustaba visualmente a la descripción interna de su esencia, una estructura que la define tanto por fuera como por dentro… Pero faltaba ascenderla a la categoría de dibujo animado que es nuestra protagonista. Y no nos lo ha puesto fácil, porque tenemos un nivel de exigencia muy claro en como debe estar animada Cherry, si fracasábamos en esto, poníamos en peligro lo que queremos transmitirle al jugador.

Y es lo que pasó en un principio. En las primeras fases de desarrollo de nuestro juego necesitábamos a una Cherry animada para poder probar el gameplay que estábamos buscando. Digamos que esta es la Cherry que más golpes ha recibido provocados por nuestra caída en nuestras primeras fases inexpertas de desarrollo. Esta Cherry animada inicial se hizo con expectativas de ser la final, era sencillo lo que se buscaba de ella por ahora, un caminado y un estático de 8 frames en ciclo. Y la orden fue ejecutada, teníamos a una protagonista que caminaba manejada por el jugador y cuando no lo hacía, ella se mantenía estática respirando. Esta Cherry se mantenía en el mundo que creábamos, pero cuando empezamos a cambiar y madurar en el proceso creativo que estábamos llevando a cabo después de muchos golpes… nos dimos cuenta de nuestro gran error, teníamos a una protagonista animada, pero NO a Cherry. Era un caminado y un estático que serviría para cualquiera, pero nuestra Cherry exigía que su personalidad se plasmara en todos los poros de sus frames!

Como hemos comentado en más de una ocasión y repetiremos siempre, hubo un momento en concreto en la historia del desarrollo del juego que maduramos y nos dimos cuenta que había que cambiar todo lo que estábamos haciendo al realizarnos la pregunta clave “Qué queremos contar”. Y si nosotros caminábamos por este nuevo camino y cada paso que dábamos nos hacía más fuerte y madurábamos como creadores de este juego, Cherry nos tendría que acompañar. Y para ello necesitaba un nuevo caminado, un nuevo tipo de enfoque como dibujo animado.

Durante un mes estuvimos trabajando todo el equipo para asegurarnos que la nueva Cherry, seria la Cherry que queremos para esta historia y juego específico. Se hicieron muchas pruebas, caminamos mucho por los pasillos de nuestro estudio, muchas gomas se sacrificaron para dar vida a la Cherry actual. Una Cherry que fue construida a partir de un gran acierto que aplicamos esta vez: Nació de una mesa de luz real y fue animada con método tradicional, algo que no se hizo con la anterior Cherry de animación básica y sin alma. Poéticamente podríamos decir que su alma fue dibujada con lápiz, y con ésta se buscó encontrar ese equilibrio constante de alegre carisma y timidez femenina. Cherry no es un icono sexual como Betty Boop pero tampoco la extroversión animada de Mickey Mouse. Su animación bebe de muchos estilos, incluso de los que no les corresponde en su contexto histórico. Hemos tenido muy en cuenta la imagen espectral que se tiene del estilo de la animación de los años 20 y 30. Pocos dibujos se movían de arriba hacia abajo como si siguieran un ritmo, y prácticamente todos los recordamos así. Y así se muestran en representaciones actuales de ese estilo, como en capítulos de “Futurama” o de los “Looney Tunes”.

Cherry ya existe como queremos en el Toonville que estamos creando y ya está recorriendo su camino como dibujo animado. Después de todas las caídas que ha tenido en su desarrollo, cada uno de los pasos que está haciendo, animados o no, nos da mucha fuerza a nosotros para seguir adelante en nuestro propio camino para dar vida a esta aventura. Es irónico, pero sin duda alguna, la damisela en apuros de este juego ha sido precisamente la que nos ha rescatado en nuestra propia historia, ¡ella es nuestra heroína y ahora nos toca a nosotros devolverle el favor!


☞ ENGLISH:

The damsel in distress is a recurrent classic theme through the history of narrative. From Greek mythology to our game, the “hero saves girl” formula has been used countless times.

In the video we can see how in the golden age of American animation, series such as Betty Boop, Popeye, Mickey Mouse etc… used this structure in almost all chapters. This also occurs in many video game titles, where women have been classified in two roles, the previously mentioned damsel in distress as Princes Peach and the already forged heroines as Lara Croft, but we rarely see the path of the hero in the protagonists.

So, in Crazy Hotel, instead of using this formula as is, we have decided to use it as the basis for a different new version of the damsel in distress.

ESPAÑOL:

La damisela en apuros es un tema clásico muy recurrente a lo largo de la historia de la narrativa. Desde la mitología griega hasta nuestro juego, son incontables las veces que se ha usado esta fórmula para contar la historia de héroe salva a chica en apuros.

En el video podemos ver como en la época dorada de la animación americana, series como Betty Boop, Popeye, Mickey Mouse etc… usaban esta estructura en casi todos los capítulos. Esto también ocurre en muchos títulos de videojuegos, donde las mujeres están algo encasilladas en dos roles: el ya comentado damisela en apuros, como la princesa Peach, o las heroínas ya forjadas como Lara Croft, pero raras veces vemos un camino del héroe en las protagonistas.

Así que, en Crazy Hotel, en vez de plasmar tal cual esta fórmula, hemos decidido utilizarla como base para contar de forma diferente una nueva versión evolucionada de la damisela en apuros.



☞ ENGLISH:

At this point, we need the places that Cherry will visit in the adventure to take shape using the ideas that the script presents. The place where everything happens is the Hyperion Hotel, an old building divided in floors. These floors are, in turn, subdivided in scenes, the basic element that we use to create the environments the adventure will take place in. Each scene follows the same guidelines and process to eventually become the stage Cherry will walk on.
Before starting to work on Crazy Hotel’s concept art the whole team meets to discuss and present their views on how they envision each of the hotel’s environments. This way it’s easier to achieve a global vision of the different stages from every perspective.
At first, concept art work is done with complete freedom, not even knowing or caring about which elements will fit in the future level. Still, it’s important to not lose sight of the style used in the other scenes and to never forget about the particular traits of cartoons: curvy objects with face, round and fluffy arms and legs… Always a bit over the top. These cartoony objects are usually mixed with commonplace designs though, this is so that there’s not an overload of visual information in a given stage.



Using these concepts as a basis it’s now time to start building the playable tile map. This map will serve as the foundations over which all the objects and characters will be placed and should try to combine the best of the drawings created previously, taking always into account the importance of gameplay and the function of the stage in the story. When assigning the collision tiles of the level one should put some thought into how the player will move through the game world, which are the pathways that will be more commonly traversed (because they connect the level to other scenes, because they lead to a character or item that’s important to progress in the game) and design the stage accordingly so that it’s easy to move around, minimizing the number of obstacles the player will encounter.
Each tile must be assigned a type that defines it’s behaviour and interaction with Cherry and the stage elements. Thus, a tile can be a collision, a pit, a connection between scenes or a body of water, among others.



Once again the team joins to review all the work done until this point. Here it’s decided what stays and what goes, this is one of the first filters the artistic process must go through. Sometimes an idea that seemed good on paper does not work so well after translating it into a tile map, so it must be reconsidered or discarded.
With the general look of a level mostly settled, pencil and rubber are replaced with a graphics tablet and work continues to the next step: ingame sketches. This is temporary art, outlined in blue (or red if an object is interactive) and filled with white color so that objects and characters don’t overlay and blend visually. These drawings are placed in a specific isometric grid where the whole stage gets drawn exactly as it would look in the Unity engine.
It’s now when we start taking into account the size of the objects and characters as their collisions will always fill the size of a tile. If we don’t take care allocating the elements, the players would feel that they’re colliding with empty spaces near thin objects which don’t have a collision related to their design. The most troublesome elements are those whose size or width is pretty small, such as a coat rack, a floor lamp or a little ball. There is no easy solution to this, although grouping these objects together or putting them inside bigger objects should do.



While adding provisional graphics to the scene, we also start working in its logic. That way, we start assigning the corresponding dialog to the room characters and objects.
If there are puzzle elements on the scene, they’re added in this moment. These elements can be generic and reusable (such as boxes or buttons) or they may require some specific graphics. Cherry’s spawn points are also placed now, and we assign the scenes that connect with this room.
Finally, we code all the specific behaviours needed in the current room. This is a must to take into account the player progress or to modify the scene accordingly to show that progress.
At this point, the scene is fully playable and interactive. We can now test it and see if the design works as we intended. It’s very likely that each time the game is tested, we find some issues we need to change, going back to previous stages. The testing should be thorough enough to find most mistakes before we start producing the final graphics, but that’s not always possible and many scenes have to change months after we thought they were finished.
When everything has been checked enough times, next stage goes to the art division: the final graphics. Here we have the two different styles we’ve talked about before; first the background, non-interactive objects; and secondly, those which, among the characters, change their state or are interactive. The first sort has a treatment closest to painting, it has light and shadows and demands  a higher level of detail, as an example, it’s different to paint wood textures than stone. On the other hand, we have the interactive objects, which have a precise line thickness that is the same for all objects and they are painted with plain colors from a defined color palette.
As you can see, creating a scene is a very cyclical process, going over the art, code and the room design again and again, until we get the final result. But it’s thanks to this process that we get scenes where logic and art blend together into a single goal.




ESPAÑOL:

Llegados a este punto, necesitamos que los lugares que Cherry visita en la historia tomen forma más allá de las ideas que presenta el guión. El lugar donde ocurre todo es el Hotel Hyperion, que, como es un edificio, está dividido en plantas. A su vez, estas plantas se subdividen en escenas, el elemento del que partimos a la hora de crear los escenarios de la aventura. Y cada escena sigue un proceso casi idéntico para llegar desde la idea hasta el suelo que pisa Cherry.
A la hora de crear el arte conceptual de “Crazy Hotel”, el equipo se reúne previamente para exponer sus opiniones y visiones sobre cómo imaginan cada una de las zonas del hotel siendo así más sencillo que haya una visión global de ciertas escenas y ambientes desde todas las perspectivas. El equipo entero es parte viviente de lo que se va a expresar en el juego.
Cuando se comienza a dibujar, se hace con total libertad, ni siquiera sabiendo qué cosas encajarán al pasarlo al escenario “real”. Además, es importante no perder de vista el estilo utilizado en el resto de salas y no olvidar nunca las características particulares de la línea cartoon (propias y adquiridas): objetos retorcidos, con cara, brazos, pies…, blanditos e hinchados. Siempre exagerados. Cierto es que a veces están mezclados con otros objetos más corrientes que no tienen “personalidad”; esto ocurre para que no haya un colapso de información visual en cada escenario.

A partir de los distintos conceptos de escenario para una determinada escena se comienza en este momento a crear el mapa de tiles jugable por el que se moverá Cherry. Este mapa deberá servir de base para colocar en el futuro los objetos dibujados y deberá conciliar lo mejor de los conceptos creados anteriormente, teniendo siempre en cuenta la jugabilidad y la función del escenario. A la hora de asignar los tiles de colisión del escenario hay que valorar la navegabilidad del mismo, pensar de qué manera lo va a recorrer el jugador, cuales son los caminos que más se van a transitar (porque conectan con otras escenas, porque llevan a un objeto o personaje importante para el progreso en el juego) y diseñarlos en consecuencia, de manera que sean sencillos de recorrer, minimizando el número de obstáculos y dificultades para el jugador.
Cada tile del escenario deberá estar asignado con el tipo de tile que corresponda. El tipo define el comportamiento del tile, su interacción con Cherry y con los objetos del escenario. Así, un tile podrá ser una pared colisionable, un agujero, una conexión entre escenas o una superficie de agua, entre otros.

Y de nuevo, se repite el proceso de supervisión del equipo con el concept art ya realizado. Aquí se decide qué se queda dentro del juego y qué no: es uno de los primeros filtros por los que transcurre el proceso artístico, pero ni mucho menos el último. A veces, una idea es buena sobre el papel y en el momento de traspasarla al mapa de tiles, tenemos que desecharla ya que no encaja o no se entiende o simplemente es un guiño que alarga innecesariamente recorrido o guión.
Decidido el aspecto general de las salas, y moviéndose el arte en paralelo con la programación, el papel y el lápiz se sustituyen por una tableta gráfica y da comienzo el siguiente paso: los bocetos in game. Se trata de un tipo de arte provisional, normalmente tratado solo a línea azul (o roja si son objetos interactuables) y relleno de blanco para que cuando los objetos y los personajes se superpongan, no se mezclen visualmente. El material se va extrayendo de los concepts -scans y/o fotografías- y colocando en una grid especial en vista isométrica donde se dibuja la sala entera tal y como quedaría si estuviese en la grid de Unity.
En este punto, se comienza a tener en cuenta el tamaño de los objetos y personajes diseñados puesto que las colisiones ocuparán siempre como mínimo el tamaño predeterminado de un tile cuadrado. De no tener cuidado al distribuir los objetos, el jugador podrá pensar en ocasiones que está colisionando con espacios vacíos u objetos estrechos que no tienen una colisión correspondiente con su representación. Normalmente los objetos más problemáticos son aquellos pequeños, finos y/o alargados, como puede ser un perchero, una lámpara de pie o una pelota. La solución a ésto nunca es fácil, sin embargo, agrupar dichos objetos o incrustarlos dentro de otros más grandes suele funcionar.

Mientras se va añadiendo el arte provisional del escenario, se comienza también a trabajar en la lógica del mismo. Así, se comienzan a asignar las conversaciones correspondientes a los personajes y objetos de la escena. Si hay objetos de puzzle en la escena se añaden en este momento. Estos objetos puede ser genéricos y reutilizables (como las cajas o botones) o pueden requerir de arte específico.
También se definen los puntos de aparición de Cherry y se asignarán las escenas con las que está conectado el escenario actual.
Por último se creará toda la lógica específica que sea necesaria para la sala actual. Esto será imprescindible para actualizar el progreso del jugador o modificar el escenario de acuerdo a ese progreso.
Llegado este momento el escenario es completamente jugable e interactuable. Ya se puede testear y probar si el diseño funciona como se esperaba. Es fácil que al probarlo se detecten nuevos problemas y que haya que volver a alguna de las etapas anteriores para realizar cambios. El testeo debería ser suficientemente exhaustivo para detectar la mayoría de fallos antes de comenzar a producir el arte definitivo, pero esto no siempre es posible, muchos escenarios siguen cambiando meses después de pensar que estaban completados.
Cuando todo está lo bastante supervisado, se pasa al siguiente nivel en el departamento gráfico: el arte final. Aquí tenemos dos tipos de variantes que ya han sido nombradas con anterioridad, una, los objetos que se encuentran al fondo y que no son interactuables y dos, aquellos que, junto con los personajes, cambian de estado o son interactuables. La primera de ellas tiene un tratamiento más relacionado con la pintura, existen claroscuros y degradados y se exige un nivel de detalle un poco mayor. Los materiales de los que están formados los objetos influyen en cómo han de ser pintados, por ejemplo es distinto el proceso de pintar madera que piedra. Y por otro lado los interactuables, que tienen un grosor de línea muy preciso e igual para todos y están pintados con colores planos en una gama de grises definida.
Como podéis ver, el proceso de crear un escenario es muy cíclico, volviendo a revisar el arte, el código y el diseño de la propia sala hasta obtener el resultado final. Pero gracias a este proceso es como obtenemos escenarios donde la lógica y el arte se funden de forma ideal en un único objetivo.


AdCast - Ads from the Community

×

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconajax1946:
ajax1946 Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Artist
Thanks for the fave on Barbara Eden. :)
Reply
:iconslackbun:
slackbun Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I truly appreciate the favourite, thank you so much! :hug:
If you find my artwork to be interesting I hope you will stick around for more! ^^ maybe, perhaps.. idunno, but thank you anyways :>
Reply
:iconredlittlehouse:
RedLittleHouse Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2015
Really nice art ;D Your paintings are amazing, very emotional.
Reply
:iconsamnosca:
Samnosca Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2015  Student Digital Artist
Thanks a lot for the fav, very appreciated:D
Reply
:iconredlittlehouse:
RedLittleHouse Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2015
Anytime! Wink/Razz 
Reply
:iconghostwinchester:
GhostWinchester Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you for the fav *-* :hug:
Reply
:iconredlittlehouse:
RedLittleHouse Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2015
No problem! :D
Reply
:iconspikings:
Spikings Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you for the fave! :aww:
Reply
:iconredlittlehouse:
RedLittleHouse Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2015
You're welcome! :B
Reply
:iconithinkiwasinheaven:
IthinkIwasInHeaven Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Muchas gracias por el fav!! (:
Reply
Add a Comment: